Zen Leaf Nevada

Find a Zen Leaf location in Nevada and discover local state resources for medical and adult recreational users in the state.

Zen Leaf Nevada

Find a Zen Leaf location in Nevada and discover local state resources for medical and adult recreational users in the state.

Shop Your Local Zen Leaf

All Zen Leaf Dispensary Locations in Nevada

Las Vegas

Las Vegas

9120 W Post Rd Suite 103

Las Vegas NV, 89148

725-256-0936

North Las Vegas

North Las Vegas

4444 W Craig Road Suite 100-104

North Las Vegas NV, 89032

725-256-0936

Las Vegas

Flamingo

5940 W Flamingo Rd

Las Vegas NV, 89103

725-256-0936

Sierra Well Reno

Reno

1605 E 2nd St. #103

Reno NV, 89502

725-256-0936

Sierra Well Carson City

Carson City

2765 US-50 A

Carson City NV, 89701

725-256-0936

Resources for Medical Patients and Recreational Cannabis Users in Nevada

Do you have cannabis-related questions or concerns about consuming in the state of Nevada? Whether you’re a recreational user or a medical cannabis patient, we have the answers you’ve been seeking.

FAQs for Medical Cannabis Patients and Recreational Users in Nevada

Do you have pressing questions about cannabis laws in Nevada, whether they’re recreational or medical? We have the answers to some of the most commonly asked questions.

Yes, actually. In Nevada, cannabis is both recreationally legal and legal for medical purposes. Medical cannabis was legalized in 2000, while recreational cannabis was legalized in 2016, after several failed attempts throughout the years.

Nevada adults over the age of 21 are legally allowed to possess and consume cannabis within the directed allotments.

This is dependent on whether you elect for a 1-year or 2-year card. You will not have to pay a fee when registering on the Cardholder Registry site, but when you submit your application request form. The fee is $50 for a 1-year card, and $100 for a 2-year card.

Your card will need to be renewed every year to remain a valid medical cannabis patient in Nevada. With renewal, you will be required to pay the $50 or $100 fee, depending on the timeframe chosen.

Once your application is received, it will generally take between 24 and 72 hours for it to be approved or denied. Then, within the next two weeks, the state will send you your medical cannabis card in the mail.

Qualified patients must be 18 years or older if they would like to receive a medical cannabis registry ID card without consent from a parent or guardian. However, minors under the age of 18 can still qualify. If the qualifying patient is under 18, they must have their guardian register as a caregiver.

You can search for a qualified medical cannabis doctor in Nevada here.

When it comes to the personal cultivation of cannabis plants, Nevada is a bit stricter than many other states where cannabis is recreationally legal. Essentially, to be permitted to grow cannabis, the individual must live more than 25 miles from the nearest dispensary.

This is in reference to the time at which the individual begins cultivating cannabis, however. If a new dispensary opens near a person’s residence after they’ve started growing cannabis, they are permitted to continue growing.

The number of plants a person can grow depends on whether they are a medical cannabis patient or a recreational user. For example, a medical cannabis patient is allowed to grow a maximum of 12 plants at any given time. On the other hand, a recreational user is only permitted to grow six plants—or 12 per household, if two or more people live at the residence.

It is important that any personal cannabis cultivation occur in a secure location, one that isn’t visible to the public. This location must feature a lock or other security device.

In any state where there is legalized medical cannabis (including Nevada), it is not acceptable to use medical cannabis recreationally. Instead, medical cannabis should only be consumed by the qualified patient that it was prescribed to, much like any other medication. It is also expected that anyone using medical cannabis will be under the active direction and care of a doctor.

Keep in mind that recreational cannabis is legal in Nevada. If you are an adult over the age of 21, you can legally purchase and consume cannabis for recreational purposes.

If you are a medical cannabis cardholder in Nevada, you’re permitted to purchase up to 5 ounces of cannabis each month. However, you cannot purchase more than 2.5 ounces of cannabis within any two-week period.
Adults over the age of 21 are permitted to possess a maximum of 1 ounce of usable cannabis at any given time. They are also allowed to possess a maximum of 3.5 grams of cannabis concentrate.
Nevada’s cannabis users, both recreational and medical, can choose from several forms of cannabis, including edibles, flower, concentrates, topicals, and extracts, which are all available for purchase in the state.
Cannabis products in Nevada must be tested for myriad properties and contaminants, even though facilities aren’t required to be ISO certified (as is the case for states like California). Nevada’s cannabis testing labs will always test for:

Potency
Moisture content
Terpenes
Mycotoxins
Foreign matter
Heavy metals
Pesticides and herbicides
Yeast and mold
Growth regulators
Enterobacteriaceae
Pathogenic E. coli
Salmonella
Four species of Aspergillus

Nevada Gov. Steve Sisolak has even established a multiagency task force intended to crack down on corruption in the legal cannabis market. This task force is primarily focused on corruption and other illegal activity in cannabis product testing. For instance, the state has experienced issues with illegally high mold and yeast levels in cannabis products, as well as the inflation of potency levels.

To further minimize fraud within the industry, Nevada also utilizes a round-robin testing system.

Cannabis users in Nevada (recreational and medical, alike) can choose from a wide selection of strains, including various sativa, indica, and hybrid strains, all with different levels of CBD and THC.
Unable to find the strain you’re looking for at the dispensary? If this is ever the case, consider speaking with one of the dispensary’s patient assistants. Sometimes, patient assistants can ask their cultivation teams to grow a particular cannabis strain. Although this isn’t always possible, it’s worth it to ask.
According to the state’s public consumption laws, medical cannabis patients cannot use cannabis in public. Instead, individuals should only use cannabis at a private residence.

These same laws also apply to recreational cannabis users.

Yes, the state of Nevada has created a fact sheet on recreational cannabis use. You can view that document here.
No, it is never legal to drive after consuming cannabis; this is the case whether that cannabis was used for medical or recreational reasons. This is true for all states in the U.S.

If someone is found driving under the influence of cannabis, they may be arrested on DUI charges. When this occurs, the offender will not be permitted to use their medical cannabis card as a defense.

Even from the first offense (within a seven-year period), those arrested due to a cannabis DUI can face steep repercussions. This includes a fine of between $400 and $1,000, as well as between 48- and 96-hours’ worth of community service. Additionally, they may be required to participate in an educational course centered around the dangers of alcohol and controlled substance abuse. The offender will be required to pay for this course, as well.

With each cannabis DUI offense, the penalties and charges become more severe.

In Nevada, medical cannabis has been legal since 2000, when the Medical Use of Cannabis Act passed; this act is sometimes known as Question 9. However, it would be another 16 years before recreational cannabis was successfully legalized in the state, despite several failed attempts in the early 2000s.

Resources for Medical Cannabis Patients and Recreational Cannabis Users in Nevada

In Nevada, recreational cannabis use has been legal since 2016, while medical cannabis was initially legalized in 2000. If you want to learn more about cannabis use in Nevada, we’ve answered some of the most common and pressing questions you might have.

New Nevada Medical Cannabis Patients

How Do You Get a Medical Cannabis Card in Nevada?

To receive a Nevada medical cannabis card, you’ll need to be diagnosed with one of the qualifying conditions. It’s worth noting that the list of qualifying conditions and illnesses looks short, but this is misleading. Instead, there is a major caveat in this list that allows for any chronic or debilitating medical condition (as determined by a physician) to qualify an individual for a medical cannabis card. Unsure whether you qualify? Speak with your physician, as they will be able to provide you with their professional assessment.

The list includes:
Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS)
Anxiety disorders
Autism
Autoimmune diseases
Anorexia
Cancer
Glaucoma
Cachexia
Muscle spasms (including multiple sclerosis)
Opioid dependence/addiction
Seizures (not limited to forms of epilepsy)
Nausea
Severe and/or chronic pain
Conditions related to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)
A neuropathic condition, whether or not such condition causes seizures
Additional conditions specified by the Department of Health and Human Services

To begin obtaining your medical cannabis card in Nevada (assuming that you qualify), you’ll need to create an account with the state’s Online Cardholder Registry. You will then be able to complete and submit an application request form, as well as a photo of your state-issued ID and a $25 fee.

Make sure to fully fill out your application once you receive it. You will then need to send it to the Division of Public and Behavioral Health (DPBH), including written documentation from your physician. To submit this application, you will need to pay an additional fee of $75.

Where Do I Go to Apply for a Patient or Caregiver Medical Cannabis Card in Nevada?

To begin applying for a medical cannabis card in the state, you’ll need to request an application through the Nevada Medical Cannabis Cardholder Registry. Your completed form will then be sent to the state Division of Public and Behavioral Health.

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